Welcome to

Juniper Level Botanic Garden ​

One of the largest and most diverse plant collections in the world.

Our mission

Collect, study, preserve, propagate and share plants for a better world

The mission of Juniper Level Botanic Garden is to promote botanical diversity by assembling the largest collection possible of growable, winter/summer hardy ornamental plants for our region and display them in an aesthetic, sustainably-maintained, healthy garden setting. This philosophy includes obtaining plants from all over the world with a strong emphasis on North American native plants, realizing that these are, as a group, no more or less adaptable than plants from foreign lands. Plants are obtained through plant exploration, plant breeding, as well as exchange and purchase from other botanic gardens and horticultural experts.

Crevice garden homepage

A special place​

Juniper Level Botanic Garden is an 8-acre educational, research, and display garden filled with more than 27,000 taxa of plants, including native perennials, exotic plants, rare delights, and an array of incredible and unusual specimen trees and shrubs you won’t see anywhere else in the world.

The garden was designed using the philosophy of “drifts of one” to house and showcase a diverse collection of ornamental plants in an aesthetic and relaxed setting. Juniper Level Botanic Garden has evolved into one of the largest ex-situ plant collections in the world. The garden is designed for year-round interest with peak season from late April through mid-October.

37

Years since established

27

Thousand different taxa

Our History​

JLBG was established in 1986 when Raleigh native Tony Avent and his wife Michelle purchased a 2.2 acre abandoned sandy loam tobacco field in the community of Juniper in Southern Wake County (central North Carolina). 

The garden name originated from “junipers” which used to grow along nearby Juniper Branch. These plants were Chamaecyparis thyoides. The southern term “Level” is used for the flat areas between creeks, hence the community name, Juniper Level.

Timeline

1986​

Breaking ground

Tony and Michelle purchase a home on 2.2 acres, garden construction begins on the Founders Garden. Plant Delights Nursery is simultaneously established.

1996​

First expansion

The Avents purchase 5.25 acres of adjoining property expanding the garden and nursery area. The old house becomes office space for the nursery and garden. This section becomes Michelle’s Garden.

2001

Second expansion

The Avents purchase 11 acres of adjacent property for parking, expanded production, research, plant trials, evaluations and woody plant collections.

2008

Third expansion

The Avents purchase 3.66 acres from the estate of the late Eddy Souto. Half of the property is devoted to field production, while the other half becomes the full sun Souto Garden.

2014

Yde Horse Farm purchase

The Avents need to build a new home outside of the public area of JLBG. Two acres of the property are dedicated to parking lot expansion, while the remaining four become the new home and Anita’s Garden. This brings the size of JLBG to 28 acres.

2017

Crevice garden construction

The 300 feet long habitat for ultra dryland, alkaline-loving plants, is made of nearly 200 tons of recycled concrete and takes 3 years to complete.

Open Garden and Nursery Days

We are open to the public four times a year, two weekends each season.

Open Garden and Nursery Days

We are open to the public four times a year, two weekends each.

Become a JLBG garden member

As a founding member you will be helping to support the much-needed increase in staffing and maintenance of the collection and garden as we work towards the public garden transition. You are also increasing our ability to reach and educate the growing numbers of visitors in our rapidly expanding community.

Individual

Great choice for a beginner gardener. Includes basic benefits to help you expand your knowledge.

$50

/ year

Family/Dual

Best value for a family (2 adults and children under age of 16) interested in gardening.

$75

/ year

Explorer

Expanded benefits for an intermediate gardener who is looking to deepen their knowledge.

$150

/ year

Sponsor

Top tier package for people who share our vision and want to ensure the future of JLBG.

$300

/ year

Educational resources​

Expand your gardening knowledge by reading our plant articles, watching gardening videos and signing up for classes and events.

The Latest from
The Blog

Our daily garden blog offers a peak into the array of exciting horticultural happenings at JLBG, that most folks aren’t around to see. Occasionally, we share some important news from the industry of even hop up on the soapbox when we feel the need warrants.

Acanthus hirsutus ssp. syriacus

From Syria with Serious Spines

While many people grow acanthus (bear’s breech) in their garden, I’m betting not many folks have grown the Syrian, Acanthus hirsutus ssp. syriacus. Frankly, we didn’t think this native to…

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Welcome berm garden

As the garden awakens

Here’s a shot from JLBG this morning of the gardens in front of our Botanical Gardens and Nursery staff building…so many plants (Cercis, Phlomis, Agave, Yucca, Abies bornmuelleriana, Daphne, Chamaerops…

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Agave funkiana 'Grand Funk'

Thorny and Horny

Can you imagine living your entire life, looking forward to only one sexual encounter, which will only happen just before death? Such is the life of an agave (century plant)….

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Carolina anole

Modeling the latest in sheer design

We caught a glimpse of our Carolina anole, Naomi Gamble, slinking down the green carpet last week, posing in the latest sheer, skin-revealing, summer design from the Yves Saint Laurent…

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Monkeying around with Baboon Flower

We’ve played around with the mostly tender, African Iris relative of the genus Babiana for years. So far, we’ve tried 9 of the 93 species of Baboon flower with little…

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Wowed by Wateree

Trillium oostingii by Doug Ruhren Trillium season does truly start at the turn of the calendar year, in a small way one might argue, but indeed the earliest do start…

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