North American natives

Agave lophantha 'LaBufa Baby'

Lovin’ La Bufa

We’ve grown a number of distinctive forms of the Zone 7 hardy century plant, Agave lophantha, through the years, but one of our favorites is the Yucca Do introduction, Agave lophantha ‘La Bufa Baby’, currently on sale. This was originally discovered in the Sierra Chiquita Mountains of Tamaulipas, Mexico. It’s the only selection we’ve seen

Lovin’ La Bufa Read More »

Penstemon cardinalis ssp. regalis

Hummer’s Delight

We can think of few plants better designed for hummingbirds than our clump of the native Penstemon cardinalis ssp. regalis that’s currently in flower in the JLBG crevice garden. Known as the Guadalupe Mountain beardtongue, it’s hails from the rocky, alkaline slopes (4,500′-6,000′ elevation) of southern New Mexico and adjacent West Texas, in juniper/pine scrubland.

Hummer’s Delight Read More »

Tephrosia virginiana

A Legendary Legume

I’m amazed that everyone with a dry sun garden doesn’t grow the amazing native (Wisconsin south to Florida) legume, Tephrosia virginiana, commonly known as Virginia goat’s rue. Here is our clump this week, thriving in the crevice garden. They certainly don’t require a crevice garden as long as the soils dries quickly after a rain.

A Legendary Legume Read More »

Asarum speciosum 'Bloodshot Eyes'

Amazing asarum

Two of the later flowering wild gingers are looking amazing this week. At top is the Alabama native Asarum speciosum ‘Bloodshot Eyes’, a 2020 Plant Delights/JLBG introduction of a 2011 collection in Autauga County, Alabama with larger than normal flowers. At the bottom is the Japanese native Asarum sakawanum var. stellatum with it’s starfish-like flowers

Amazing asarum Read More »

Podophyllum peltatum 'Maid Marion'

March flowers bring May Apples, along with a Taxonomic headache

We’ve been fascinated by mayapples of the genus Podophyllum, ever since first studying them in my NC backyard over 60 years ago. It was always a bit disappointing that they went dormant in late May, and often seem to be afflicted by several foliar diseases. It was not until three decades later (mid-1990s) that I

March flowers bring May Apples, along with a Taxonomic headache Read More »

Smart as a Blue Oak

Looking great well into December is the North American native, Salvia chamaedryoides, known as Blue Oak sage. This evergreen, dryland native hails form 7,000′ to 9,000′ elevation in the Chihuahuan Desert of northern Mexico. For us, it flowers heaviest in spring and fall, with dark, cobalt blue flowers. It’s one of the few silver leaf

Smart as a Blue Oak Read More »

Scroll to Top