rock garden plants

Pulsatilla halleri ssp. styrica

Pass the Pasque Flower

The earliest of the pasque flowers of the genus, Pulsatilla have begun to flower in the crevice/rock garden. The common name “pasque” is a reference to the flowering period, which typically coincides with Passover/Easter. The genus is native to Europe, Asia, and North America, where they reside primarily in the colder, drier regions of each.

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Narcissus 'Spoirot'

Playin’ Hoops in Winter

More of the winter-flowering hoop petticoat daffodils continue to open every week in the garden. Below is Narcissus ‘Spoirot’…an exceptional 1998 introduction, that originated at Tasmania’s Glenbrook Farm, as a cross of Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuus and N. cantabricus subs cantabricus var foliosus. It’s namesake is Agatha Christie’s detective extraordinare, Hercule Poirot. It was originally

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First Flowers of Flat Iris

Late December marks our first flowering of Iris planifolia. This odd native to Southern Europe and Northern Africa has a similar distribution to the better-known Iris unguicularis, but this Iris belongs to the group, known as Juno or bulbous iris. These deciduous iris are extremely sensitive to summer moisture, which is why this resides in

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Tongue Caught in the Crack

We’ve struggled for years to grow some of the exceptional forms of Hart’s Tongue fern, Asplenium scolopendrium in our hot, humid climate. One cultivar that we’d long been enamored with is Asplenium ‘Keratoides’. After killing nearly everything we had, we stuck one in the crevice garden, where, to our amazement, it has performed marvelously. It

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