Thus, Diane

In the hot, humid south, the word Dianthus is jokingly translated as “prepare to die”. As of this spring, we’ve grown 169 different dianthus taxa (different accessions). Of those, most are dead, a few are hanging on, and then a much smaller subset are absolutely thriving. Below are a few images from the spring garden of some (but not all) which are thriving spectacularly.

The first image is Dianthus anatolicus, planted in 2020. Virtually unknown by most gardeners, this species is native from the Black Sea region into the West Himalayas. Typically, plants from this region don’t thrive in our heat and humidity, so this was a pleasant surprise. This is growing in our typical compost amended garden loam.

Dianthus anatolicus

Dianthus arenarius is a Baltic Sea species that has thrived for us since 2018 in our crevice garden.

Dianthus arenarius

Dianthus Dianthus kuschakewiczii, aka: D.tianshanicus, a Central Asian native, has also fared amazingly well in our compost ammended beds since 2015. The idea that this tolerates our heat and humidity is quite shocking.

Dianthus kuschakewiczii

Dianthus plumarius is a well-known garden species, originating from the Northwest Balkan peninsula. It has been grown as a pass-along perennial throughout the Southeastern US for over a century. This species has been cultivated in the UK since 1100AD, and in the US since 1676. Our clone is one that has been passed along in the Birmingham, Alabama area.

Dianthus plumarius ‘Birmingham’

The horticultural world has been replete with an array of dianthus hybrids through the years. We’ve managed to kill quite a few, but the ones below have been exceptional in our tough conditions. Dianthus ‘Bright Light’ (aka: Dianthus Uribest52), is a Korean hybrid from the breeding firm, Uriseed, which was derived from crossing Dianthus alpinus (from the Alps) with Dianthus callizones from Romania. Our clumps have been in since 2018, and excelled in unirrigated sections of the garden. This is one of the finest garden dianthus we’ve ever grown.

Dianthus ‘Bright Light’

Dianthus ‘Cherry Charm’ is a Dutch hybrid of Dianthus gratiopolitanus , which has been every bit as exceptional as Dianthus ‘Bright Light’. Our clumps, which are now four years old are nothing short of outstanding.  

Dianthus ‘Cherry Charm’

Dianthus ‘White Crown’ is the smallest of the excellent performing selections in our trial. We have had this in the crevice garden since 2017, growing in 3′ of Permatill, so we doubt this would thrive in typical garden soils. This is a Wrightman Gardens introduction of unknown parentage.

Dianthus ‘White Crown’

3 thoughts on “Thus, Diane”

  1. Thank you for mentioning which ones are growing well in typical compost amended garden loam. For those of us who do not have Perma-Till crevice gardens, that is very helpful. In my childhood north of Boston, MA, I would just throw out seeds of pinks in our loamy garden soil, and they thrived for years. I’ve been disappointed by Dianthus time and again here in Raleigh, NC. Good to know it is not just drainage, that it is also our humidity. Is the ‘Cherry Charm’ that you mentioned also growing in your crevice garden, or composty loam? I see JCRA is growing it in one of their xeric beds.

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